Top Tier Tips: Mid Match Style Switch

Top Tier Tips is a series of bite-sized guides about improving in Street Fighter through various means. We’ll suggest some of the “best practices” used by players to improve more quickly and become tournament caliber players.

If your current playstyle isn’t working, switch it up immediately and play in the opposite manner.

Many lower-level players feel that they always need to be moving forward and attacking. Against a more skilled opponent, this plan often fails and the lower-level player’s response is to double down on their bet and try to go in even harder. How many times has this happened to you? Consider this kind of reckless play the expressway to the loser’s bracket. Remember that Street Fighter and fighting games in general, are games of knowledge; doing what your opponent expects gives them the upper hand in the fight.

If you can instead, completely 180 on your playstyle in the match, it might give you just the edge you need to throw them off balance. Imagine a scenario where the first match, you attack attack attack and lose, then the second round, you hit your opponent and then immediately back off. This kind of plan is a great power play because it tells your opponent “If you don’t do something. I’ll win with this life lead.” and it forces them to become the attacker. And immediately you’ve reversed the roles. Now you know what your opponent has to do and you can start to better predict how they will try to attack. You’ve also forced them to interrupt their gameplan and create a completely new one on the spot.

The master level of this is to continuously switch during a match. Going from offense to defense, and back again to throw your opponent off and make your movements or strategy unreadable. An opponent who can’t predict you forces them to “play scared” relying on base reactions which can be taken advantage of. Give it a shot. Imagine how frustrated a Dhalsim player would be trying to actually go in on their opponent, or how hard it must be fighting a defensive Zangief. Attack when they expect you to defend and defend when they expect you to attack.

Senior Series: The Argument for 2 Mains

They historical norm players is to choose a character they like and gel with and then to dedicate all of their time and energy to learning the intricacies of that character, how they interacted with the game engine, and the way their match-ups were to be played. I think Joe sums it up quite nicely with his quip on Japan’s playstyle from 0:29 – 0:35

Very rarely in the history of a street fighter game has anyone ever been considered the strongest player, playing more than one character…

…. Until SFV.

With Players like NuckleDu running Guile and Mika, and Punk and his tag team duo of Nash and Karin, it seems in this game that there is a very real possibility to play more than 1 character at a high level. SFV, being a very linear game, makes the skill ceiling much lower than other iterations, and making it possible to more fully explore all the aspects of a character in a limited amount of time.

Whatever character you play, you can probably classify them into one of three archetypes: Offense, Defense, Grapple. Though opinions may differ, generally the following is true:

Offense beats Defense

Defense beats Grapple

Grapple beats Offense

You can probably think of your match-up and see that this is likely the case in determining which are advantageous, disadvantageous, and even. In order to cover all of your match-ups, all you need to do is invest time in a character who beats your main character’s weakness. Then rather than grind out match-ups with a secondary character against the cast, save yourself the time and just play only the character’s who beat your main’s style.

Some people might argue, that they want to have the deepest knowledge of the match-up and simply continue with one character, and that is a fair and valid argument, but in a game like SFV where you don’t currently have to spend 3 to 4 years exploring a single character, it’s also a fair argument that you might be doing yourself a disservice in trying to work so hard against a style that clearly dominates yours.

As Joe said, it’s literally, “one character, till death.” Make sure it’s the right one for the job.

Top Tier Tips: In the Lab

Top Tier Tips is a series of bite-sized guides about improving in Street Fighter through various means. We’ll suggest some of the “best practices” used by players to improve more quickly and become tournament caliber players.

Take the first 30 minutes of any training mode session to explore some situation. 

It can be something you’ve had trouble with or a situation you don’t know much about. If you’re just going into training mode even to practice combos, work on learning something new within the first 30 minutes. The combo practice will still be there, and is a great way to wind down in training mode because the requirements are very simple success is easily defined; just completing the combo.

Although I recommend you practice situations with your main character, it doesn’t have to be. Anything that lets you explore the system mechanics is a worthwhile endeavor. If you can’t think of any, here a couple to get you started.

  • What happens when Ed’s V-Trigger and Dhalsim’s Critical Art collide?
  • Can you use Cammy’s c.MK to go under jump attacks?
  • Is Fang’s V-Skill parry-able?
  • Is there a situation where Ryu’s jumping tatsumaki senpukyaku can cross an opponent up?
  • Can you throw Dhalsim during the start of his teleport?
  • Is there a way to tell if Alex is going to do his slash elbow?
  • How does your character deal with Vega’s wall dive?
  • How can M.Bison [Dictator] make his devil’s reverse, move backward?

Still if you’re having problems thinking of a situation to explore, fire up Youtube and take the first 10 minutes looking at match videos of great players and picking one situation, and explore it. There is more than a lifetime of material to be found in these situations.

Great players look at every nook and cranny of a situation and explore different ideas until they can find results. At live practice sessions with Top Japanese players, they intentionally leave a set-up open for a single person, so when that person loses and rotates out to the next player, they can use the open set-up to test the situation they felt they lost in. This makes for instant feedback, and when you get a full grasp of the situation, you can rotate back in and test it out with the person immediately. This in turn builds muscle memory and awareness of what is going on in their play.

101 Series: Cammy

The 101 series is meant to help new players quickly get acclimated to a character and to give them the knowledge and tools to play effectively with a character as fast as possible. This series won’t be covering the complex aspects of each character, rather we will talk about the basic points of the character and what makes them strong. It is our hope that this series serves as a jumping-off point for you to more deeply explore the character.

What is she good at?

One of the original street fighter characters, Cammy is a offensive machine. She has a very simple tool set that allows her to pressure the opponent at nearly every turn. With great buttons from mid range and and close range, in addition to her cannon strike, dive-kick like attack, she can keep the opponent guessing at all times. She has the ability to take the enemy from mid screen to the corner by ending combos with her spiral arrow attack. If you’re looking for a character who can get in and attack attack attack without the difficult execution, Look no further.

Footsies

Cammy has some of the strongest footsies attacks in the game which really make it difficult for her opponent to keep up with her at mid range.

c.MK :

Very very long range crouching poke. Be careful, even though her body moves very low to the ground, she can still be hit by moves that are a higher than her animation appears. This move should not be used to go under attacks as it will likely fail. Also cancellable into spiral arrow if it hits.

s.MK:

Longer range than her c.MK, but is not cancellable. Also has the added effect of going over lower attacks. This is a great move to annoy the hell out of your opponent with.

c.HP:

Although a bit on the slower side, this attack moves Cammy forward ever so slightly, which makes this a great way stay in range for attacks after taking a small step back. It’s also if it hits, you can confirm into V-Trigger and follow-up for a big combo.

Anti-Air

b.MP

Incredibly fast and virtually never loses to air attacks. If you anti-air an opponent with this, you have the option to dash forward and try to mix the opponent up when they land by doing an attack on their left or right side.

s.HK

This attack is a bit harder to use because of it’s start-up, but if you counter-hit the opponent, you get a crush counter which leaves your opponent spinning in the air. You can generally follow-up by doing a dp.HK Cannon Strike.

dp.MK

Cammy’s Cannon Strike attack. A solid, “shoryuken-like” attack which has great range. You needn’t worry about opponents changing their jump-in timing by doing a delayed dive kick if you use this move. It will beat anything in the air.

Combos

c.LK, c.LP xx qcf.HK

Your quick confirm attack into a knockdown. Carries your opponent very far to the corner, which allows you to continue offense.

s.MP, s.HP xx dp.HK

Bread and butter for damage. Make sure you hit your opponent which s.HP, because if they block the DP, you will get crush countered.

f.HK, c.MP xx dp.HK

Strongest meterless combo. Linking into c.MP from f.HK isn’t difficult, but it feels a bit weird. Practice! practice! practice!

s.MP, s.HP xx qcf.LK, dp.KK

Great metered corner combo. Practice this before using it in a series, match as the timing to get the Cannon Spike after the Spiral arrow is a bit weird.

b.MP > s.HK xx hcf.PP > K, dp.HK

Probably the most taxing combo Cammy has executionally. Great midscreen, but HK Cannon Spike might be difficult. If you’re having trouble, you can change the HK to MK Cannon Spike for ease.

 

Offense

Frame Traps

s.MP, c.MP, c.MK or s.HP
c.MP, c.LP, c.MP

Cammy’s s.MP is wonderful because it grants her a lot of frame advantage and also builds white block damage fairly quickly. The first frame trap here the s.MP into the c.MP will catch any stray buttons the opponent presses. If the opponent is caught pressing buttons, the c.MP will become a counter hit and you will be able to link into c.MK. If the opponent guards the c.MP, the gap between c.MP and c.MK is can be interrupted, but generally isn’t. If the opponent starts to interrupt your c.MK, you can switch it up and start doing s.HP instead which will generally catch them.

The second frame trap is used for complete safety. While the first frame trap has some gaps in the latter half that are possible to break through by an opponent, this frame trap will catch anything the opponent presses that doesn’t have invincibility. If the opponent blocks the whole sequence, it also sets you up with the spacing to do a very fast cannon MK cannon strike. If you do it fast enough, the cannon strike will hit the opponents legs and you will be able to continue offense with a c.LP or c.MP. Again, this takes considerable practice so be wary before you throw it into your game.

*Pro-Tip*
Cammy’s Cannon Strike

At first glance, Cammy’s cannon strike doesn’t seem like it has much use. Generally if the opponent blocks it, Cammy is put at a disadvantageous position. This is because the attack generally strikes an opponent in their chest. To make it more effective, try hitting your opponent blow their waist. If you can do this, Cammy will retain advantage, and you can continue offense with s.LP, c.LP, b.MP, or c.MP. It’s best to visualize your opponent’s body in two different boxes. The top half which is bad, and the bottom half which is good. Practice the ranges at where you can hit your opponent’s lower half so you can keep the rush-down going. 

Okizeme [Wake-Up Pressure]:

Cammy’s knockdown situations are fairly straight forward and don’t require too much finesse.

qcf.HK

Knocking down the opponent with the heavy version of spiral arrow is like Okizeme on training wheels. Afterward, immediately dash forward and depending on their wake up tendencies, do the following.

Quick Recovery:

c.MP [You can combo into s.MP on counter-hit.]

Back Recovery:

s.MK [It’s generally difficult to do, but you can in some situations combo into s.HP on counter-hit]

qcf.LK

Ending a combo with the LK version of Cannon Strike allows you to immediately dash up  and do Cammy’s f.HK attack. The great thing about this set-up is that it will hit the opponent on both of their wake-up timings. You should be advised however, that if f.HK is blocked, Cammy is put into a slightly disadvantageous position and you should just block to avoid getting hit.

Defense

Though offense is where Cammy shines, her defensive skills aren’t half bad either. She has EX Cannon Strike which will blow through any attack, however be careful that the opponent is in range. Unlike the regular Cannon Strike attacks, this attack does not move forward at all. Cammy also has a great V-Reversal, which causes her to switch sides with her opponent and attack them. This is great because any situation where Cammy is on defense in the corner, forces her into the corner and allows her to become the attacker.

V-System

Cammy’s V-Skill isn’t great when used by itself, but against an opponent who has been condition to block, does allow it to see some use. The V-Skill attack causes her to hop forward which allow her to go over some low attacks during this time, and then attack. If you are close to your opponent when you do this attack, Cammy will hop to the other side and then attack. If the attack lands, you can generally combo into a s.HP afterward. If it’s blocked, Cammy is still at an advantageous position and can continue offense. It should be advised that this attack does have considerable start-up animation before it actually hits the opponent, so be sure to weigh the risk before throwing this out willy-nilly

Recommended V-Skill combo:
V-Skill, s.HP xx qcf.HK

Cammy’s V-Trigger is incredibly straight forward. It puts her in a state that powers up the next 2 special attacks she uses. Her spiral arrow will shoot forward across the screen and is invincible to fireballs. If it hits, it allows cammy to follow up with her Cannon Spike attack for big damage. Speaking of the Cannon Spike,the powered up version makes it a perfect shoryuken-like attack. Incredible range, fully invincible, and super-fast. And finally her Cannon Strike dive-kick becomes multi-hit, very fast, advantageous on block, and allow her to combo if it hits. A very cool thing is that against opponents stationary V- Reversals, Cammy will simply go through them and land on the other side, allowing her to continue offense or punish them for an ill-timed v-reversal.

Recommended V-Trigger combo:
j.qcb.K, s.MP, s.HP xx qcf.K, dp.KK

 

101 Series: Ed

The 101 series is meant to help new players quickly get acclimated to a character and to give them the knowledge and tools to play effectively with a character as fast as possible. This series won’t be covering the complex aspects of each character, rather we will talk about the basic points of the character and what makes them strong. It is our hope that this series serves as a jumping-off point for you to more deeply explore the character.

What is he good at?

Introduced in season 2, Ed is a kind of character that has never existed in the Street Figther Series ever before. Instead of using motion like quarter circle forward or charging motions, Ed only has special moves that are button presses. He isn’t particularly strong far away, but when he is close, his attacks can be suffocating. For opponents who are far away, Ed can also use his V-Skill which can reel opponents in and put him in an advantageous position. He also has very strong options against opponents who try to often jump at him, by aiming his V-Skill or other attacks like Psycho Rising.

Footsies

Ed’s footsies, are a bit on the stubby side, but his moves make up what they lack in range with their different properties.

c.MK :

You have to be careful using this move. Although it’s one of his longest reaches normal attacks. Even at max range, cancelling it will cause the special move to whiff.

s.HK:

This move has good range, also goes over lows and is able to crush counter opponents and follow-up for damage. Just be careful using this move very close to your opponent as you can be hit by some characters if it’s blocked.

s.HP:

This move is chargeable, and although that’s alright, what really makes it great is the fact that Ed reels back during the charge, and whenever you release the button he will punch. Ed has the ability to dodge out of the way of an opponents attack when charging, then release, and hit them opponent while their attack is recovering. Be careful not to hold it for too long or you’ll get the charged version which puts Ed at a disadvantage if blocked.

Anti-Air

c.HP

Great anti-air and also crush counters opponents if the beginning of the move is a counter hit. Allows you to get a small combo from a crush counter.

V-Skill

Although it can be difficult to execute quickly enough for the move to come out, Ed’s down plus V-Skill can be used to scoop opponents out of the sky for a hard knockdown and net you a bit a v-meter in the process

KK

Pressing any two kick buttons, has Ed do his uppercut kick attack. This move is a great anti-air, and can be followed up with, with by pressing any punch button. If you press two punch buttons instead, you can do an EX attack.

Combos

c.LK, c.LP xx KK > P

Your quick confirm attack into a knockdown.

s.MP, c.MK xx PP

Bread and butter combo for damage. Be careful, if you are too far away, PP will miss the opponent.

s.MP, c.HP xx KK > P

Your meterless punish combo of choice.

s.MP, c.HP xx KK > PP, d.V-Skill

This is your basic punish combo with one meter. Also builds a little V-Gauge as well.

c.HP [Crush Counter], j.MP, d.V-Skill

This is a great meterless crush counter combo that builds about 80% of 1 V-Gauge bar.

Offense

Frame Traps

c.LP, s.MP, c.MK
c.LP, s.MP, c.MP, s.HK or s.HP

As Ed want’s to be near his opponent at all times, it’s important to start your pressure strings with c.LP. It also leaves Ed at a range that lets him throw afterward. The frame trap ending with c.MK is good to end in case any attack before it connects and if you do hit your opponent, you can follow-up with PP.

If you want to keep up the pressure for longer, then you can use the second frame trap listed. The double s.MP will hit an opponent trying to attack between each of them. If the opponent blocks both, you can do s.HK to over low attacks afterward and maybe get a crush counter. You also have the choice of doing s.HP. This move is interesting, because it can be held. and the charging motion reels the character back. You can use the reelback to dodge an attack and then punish afterward. Don’t hold it too long though or you’ll get the full animation which puts Ed in a bad position if the opponent blocks it.

Okizeme [Wake-Up Pressure]:

Many of Ed’s options when he knocks down an opponent are very similar even from different attacks. He does have to guess the opponent’s wake-up choice however, so be careful of taking these kinds of risks.

PP

A knockdown from Psycho Upper gives Ed two basic options. First you should dash forward, then you should do either s.HP or s.HK based on the opponent’s choice to wake-up. Check the small chart below.

Quick Recovery:

s.HP [Crush counter’s on hit]

Back Recovery:

s.HK [Crush counter’s on hit]

KK > P

If you knock an opponent down with Psycho Rising into Psycho Splash, your options are essentially the same. Both of the options from Psycho Upper knockdown work here as well. Less to remember!

Defense

Ed’s defensive options are pretty good, given he has the resources to implement them. By pressing PPP, Ed’s EX Psycho upper will blow through nearly any attack. It is very invincible, but a bit slow to come out. He can also press KK to do Psyco Rising. While not immediately invincible, the beginning is invincible to fireballs, then later on completely invincible. Be careful, as being hit during the end of the move will cause you get counter hit. Additionally, Ed can V-Reversal by pressing f.KKK while blocking to roll away.

V-System

Ed’s V-Skill is a basically an energy whip that is used to close the distance between himself and the opponent. It has two versions, an air and a ground version. The ground version has two strengths, tap and hold. The tap version pulls Ed toward the opponent and he does a quick follow-up attack. If blocked he is at disadvantage. The hold version pulls the opponent toward Ed. If blocked, Ed is at a great advantage and can continue pressure. If it hits, Ed can combo from it.

The air version is used for very confident anti-airs and juggle follow-ups in V-Trigger.

Recommended V-Skill combo:
V-Skill [Hold], KK > P

Ed’s V-Trigger is a large ball of Psycho energy that moves toward the opponent. If you do V-Trigger while holding forward, the attack will travel forward faster than normal. It’s great when used from far away because it allows Ed to close the gap, and force reactions from his opponent. Use it either in combos, or as a way to get in and punish your opponent trying to escape it.

Recommended V-Trigger combo:
s.MP, c.HP, f.V-Trigger, f.dash, d.V-Skill [Hold], PP
*Pro-Tip*

Fighting as Ed

Ed doesn’t have an overhead so his pressure can be very simple to block. If opponents are blocking a lot of your pressure, you can do his charged V-Skill. If the opponent blocks the fully charged V-Skill, Ed pulls them back in where he can rinse repeat the same mix-up. What’s strong about this is if they are relatively close when he pulls them in, he can go for a throw or do jab into a throw, or jab into frame traps again. Be careful though as the V-Skill takes a long time to come out and has a lot of downtime if it misses. 

Kolin 101 Banner

101 Series: Kolin

The 101 series is meant to help new players quickly get acclimated to a character and to give them the knowledge and tools to play effectively with a character as fast as possible. This series won’t be covering the complex aspects of each character, rather we will talk about the basic points of the character and what makes them strong. It is our hope that this series serves as a jumping-off point for you to more deeply explore the character.

 

What is she good at?

Introduced in season 2, what immediately stands out about Kolin is that she has an incredibly strong counter. It can interrupt almost any blockstring and grants her a knockdown and a large damage reward if it she makes a correct prediction. If she can score even one counter, all momentum shifts to her. In addition she the ability to set traps by lobbing an iceball [her hailstorm attack] above opponents. She can create very strong mix-ups by knocking an opponent down and throwing an iceball above them. Finally, her vanity step move allows her to take a step back and then attack in a different variety of ways. She can take a step back to evade attacks, move forward again to continue offense, or jump forward for some tricky air-based offense.

Footsies

In mid-range, Kolin doesn’t have a lot of options, however she does have a few good attacks that you should constantly be using.

c.MK :

Has great range to poke opponents and also drops her body so some attacks will go over her head. It can’t be cancelled, but it does grant you the advantage to continually attack afterward because of it’s positive, frame advantage.

b.HK:

Has very good range, and goes over some lower attacks, however it is very slow. Good damage and awards you a crush counter if it counter-hits the opponent. Again, be careful of the recovery as the move is slow to retract.

V-Skill:

Kolin’s V-Skill is a forward moving swipe attack that is also a counter attack. If she is hit during this attack, she absorbs the hit, becomes fully invincible for the rest of the duration of the attack and will perform a second follow-up swipe attack. If it hits the opponent without following-up, in some cases you can continue comboing into a c.LP. Be careful as this move is punishable up close. It’s best to experiment with the range and then use it so just the very tip of the swiping attack connects. This way, if the opponent blocks, it’s very difficult to punish Kolin.

 

Anti-Air

c.HP

This is Kolin’s basic mode of hitting opponents who jump. It will often trade, and is admittedly not the best option, but is the most consistent in every situation, as her other anti-air option require some level of prediction.

qcb.HP

Kolin’s high counter is an amazing anti-air, however does require that the opponent do an attack. If they jump and do nothing, they can land and will get a large punish if you made an incorrect prediction.

j.Throw

Kolin’s air-throw is a good way to deal with jump-ins preemptively. This requires a lot of focus and to some degree good reaction to do. It’s a great choice, if you’re expecting the jump.

V-Skill

Although not effective for a jump in at a very close range, people who try to jump across the screen can be hit out of the sky, and more often than not, the counter will push them back even farther back than where they started from.

 

Combos

c.LK, c.LP xx dp.MP

Your quick confirm attack into a knockdown.

c.MP, s.MK > s.HP > V-Skill

Decent damage from pressure and builds 1/10th of your overall V-Gauge.

c.MP, s.MK xx qcf.PP, qcb.HK, j.Throw

Bread and butter for damage, and a knockdown.

s.HK, s.MK > s.HP > V-Skill

Big punish combo plus 10% V-Gauge gain.

s.HK, f.dash, c.MP, s.MK xx qcf.PP, qcb.HK, j.throw

Crush Counter combo to deal big damage

Offense

Frame Traps

c.MP, c.MP, s.MP or s.HP
c.MP, s.LP, s.MP or s.HP

Kolin’s pressure is quite good up close. Her c.MP is really good for frame traps and used together with s.MP can create very tight strings that are difficult to escape from. s.HP is great to use after c.MP because it crush counters. after the above pressure, you can use c.MK to continue pressure from far away or you can do s.LK xx LP Parabellum. s.LK is great at catching any random buttons opponent press and from so far away, LP Parabellum is hard to punish.

*Pro Tip*
After you do c.MK or or LP Parabellum, take note of what your opponent does afterward. If they always do the same attack afterward, you can use the counter in anticipation of their attack. 

Okizeme [Wake-Up Pressure]:

dp.MP

A knockdown from a MP Hailstorm gives Kolin the opportunity to pressure on an opponent’s quick recovery and back recovery. After MP Hailstorm, dash forward, and then immediately do c.MP will catch both wake-ups. In addition, You can dash forward and do a vanity step and it’s follow-ups to mix-up the opponent.

Recommended Vanity-Step follow-ups:

MK Vanity Step:

f.MK: overhead
c.MP: frame-trap

HK Vanity Step:

j.LK: high attack
empty jump, c.LK: low attack

Defense

Kolin’s defensive options are quite limited. She can sometimes use her EX Vanity step [LK+MK] to take a step back away from difficult situations. She also has the option to try and counter. Her EX counter is 1F start-up and so can be used in any situation, however you still have to choose low, mid, or high counter, which is a risky guess. If your counter fails, it will result in a counter-hit for the opponent. Finally she has the option to use V-Reversal, which is a rolling away move, but has very little range, and can be thrown.

V-System

Kolin’s V-Skill, as stated before is a forward swiping attack that can be combo’d into at close ranges, and will activate a counter-attack if she is struck during it. It is unsafe if the opponent blocks it though. For this reason, it’s best to use this attack from a distance, where Kolin cannot be punished.

Her V-trigger allows her to freeze the ground in front of an opponent. If an opponent is hit by the attacks, it knocks them far backward and freezes their stun gauge, preventing it from decreasing unless the opponent hits Kolin. V-Trigger is best used after c.MK as it can catch opponent who are trying to get away from her, or during combos, which gives her the ability to push to the opponent to the corner and dish out some extra damage.

Recommended V-Trigger Combo:
c.MP, s.MK xx qcf.PP, qcb.MK, c.HK [1-Hit] xx V-Trigger, f.dash, dp.LP

Freshman Series: Defensive Guide

This guide will serve as a introduction to the defensive mechanics present in Street Fighter V. This is part 3 of a 5-part series. The first two tutorials, cover basic Street Fighter execution and offensive strategies, respectively. If you’re new to playing Street Fighter and haven’t read those, I highly recommend you do so before reading this guide, as each guide does tend to build off of each other.

In Street Fighter V, offensive power is stronger than the defensive options for most characters. Anyone can mount a powerful offense, but what separates good players from great players is their defensive prowess. This guide will introduce you to all of Street Fighter V’s defensive tools to take you to the next level.

Blocking

If you get knocked down, and can learn to hold down-back to block when you wake up, instead of pressing buttons, you can instantly consider yourself to be a player with at least 1000 LP online. Street fighter is fun when you get to have a turn and get to press buttons and beat your opponent up, but there will be some times, where you have to be patient, and just sit back and block. As a beginner, most of the solutions to your problems early on will be “Oh, I should have not pressed buttons and just blocked there.”

The first lesson about defense is to recognize when you should be defending. When you get hit and are standing up, or as it’s more commonly called, “recovering”, you are in a disadvantageous position. For the sake of your points, please BLOCK!

Practice Exercises

Set your character to Zangief and set the dummy to Ryu. Use action recording for Ryu doing his HP Hadouken [qcf.HP], and immediately stop the recording. Reset the position to middle, and move back as far as possible with Zangief. Set the dummy to playback. Try to walk forward and block the fireballs until you can grab Ryu with a normal throw. If you get hit, restart. Keep a timer handy to check how quickly you can do it.

Success Lv. 1 = Reach Ryu in: 50 seconds
Success Lv. 2 = Reach Ryu in: 40 seconds
Success Lv. 3 = Reach Ryu in: 35 seconds

Highs and Lows

There are 2 Kinds of blocking: Crouch blocking [blocking low] and stand blocking [stand blocking]

Crouch Blocking

To crouch block, hold down-back [“back” in this case refers to the direction away from your opponent.] You will be able to block almost every grounded attack with a crouch block. It’s important not to press buttons when you are blocking. It should also be noted, that crouch blocking will lose to jumping attacks.

Stand Blocking

Stand blocking is performed by holding only back. Normally you would walk back, but when your opponent does an attack, it will cause you to stand and block. This is useful to guard against jumping attacks and some special grounded attacks. Stand blocking will lose to crouching kick attacks.

Practice Exercises

Choose any character for yourself and set the opponent to Necalli. On action recording 1, record Necalli doing the following: c.MP, c.MK, f.dash. On recording 2, record Necalli doing c.MP, df.HP, f.dash [Don’t worry, these don’t need to combo] Turn on the playback for recording 1 and 2 and try to block as many times as possible in a row.

Success Lv. 1 = 5 Successful blocks in a row.
Success Lv. 2 = 10 Successful blocks in a row.
Success Lv. 3 = 15 Successful blocks in a row.

TIP
Before I mentioned not to press buttons when you’re blocking. SFV has a special mechanic to make combos easier, so if you press a button even before it’s possible that the attack can come out, the game will still initiate the attack as soon as possible. This input buffering system is mainly to make doing combos easier, but if you’re pressing buttons when blocking an opponents attack, there is a possibility that your attack will come out after you press it.

Cross-Ups

Cross-ups hit you in such a way, that the opponent is technically behind you when they hit. When blocking this, you need to actually hold toward the direction that your opponent started from. Please see the following graphic below regarding cross-ups. Please assume that the jump before the jump attack started from the left side.

Cross-Up Graphic

Practice Exercises

Choose any character for yourself, and choose Nash as the opponent. Set recording 1 for Nash to do the following: f.dash, qcb.LK, [small step forward] j.MK. Set recording 2 to do the same thing except with a slightly longer step forward. Turn on playback for recording 1 and 2 and see if you can block the cross-ups and the normal jumps.

Success Lv. 1 = 3 times blocked in a row.
Success Lv. 2 = 7 times blocked in a row.
Success Lv. 3 = 10 times blocked in row.

TIP
If you’re not sure if an attack was a cross-up or not, don’t fret. The game actually has a built in visual aid that says “cross-up” if it’s visually difficult to tell which side a jumping attack hit you on. It will appear in orange letters on the screen if you did get hit with a cross-up. So if you got hit and you didn’t see cross-up visual, the attack wasn’t a cross-up.

Throws

All blocking loses to throws. If you remember from the offensive guide, there are 2 kinds of throw. Normal throw and command throws. You must defend against them in different ways.

For normal throws, you have 3 options to evade. You can jump back. When you jump, you are invincible to throws. You can back dash. Back dash is invincible to normal throws, but if you are hit during the beginning of a back dash, it will be considered counter hit. The final defense is to press throw [LP+LK] at the same time your opponent does. This will nullify their throw and push you away from them. This is commonly referred to as a throw-tech.

Command throws, are incredibly similar except that not every character has them and you cannot throw-tech, and you must either jump or back dash away. There are a few command throws however that will only hit enemies in the air. If you encounter one of these moves, note that they cannot grab you with the same attack if you stay on the ground.

Practice Exercises

Set the dummy to Birdie. Record the dummy doing f.dash,f.dash, s.LK, step forward, LP+LK. Set the playback and try to tech the throw. Pay attention to how late you can actually tech.

Success Lv. 1 = 1 time teched
Success Lv. 2  = 5 times teched
Success Lv. 3 = 10 times teched

Set the dummy to Cammy. Record the dummy doing f.dash, f.dash, s.LK, LK+LP. Set dummy to playback and try to tech the throw. Pay attention to how late you can actually tech.

Success Lv. 1 = 1 time teched
Success Lv. 2 = 5 times teched
Success Lv. 3 = 10 times teched

Set the dummy to R.Mika. Record the dummy doing f.dash, c.LK, hcb.LP [PLEASE NOTE YOU SHOULD NOT CANCEL c.LK into hcb.LP]. Set the playback and block the c.LK and try to get to away from the command throw.

Success Lv. 1 = 3 times escape throw
Success Lv. 2 = 5 times escape throw
Success Lv. 3 = 7 times escape throw

TIP
Most attacks don’t leave an opponent in range for a throw, so after the attack they usually have to walk forward before they hit you. In this case, holding back and walking back will make their throw attack whiff entirely. Just be careful they don’t hit you with a low kick attack!

BONUS TIP
Cammy’s Hooligan Combination is a rare exception to all of the rules stated above. It is a special attack that can grab opponents on the ground or in the air. It is the only move in the game that has this property. To properly defend against it, all you need to do is crouch. It will only throw you if you are in the air or standing up on the ground. It is not able to grab crouching.

V-Reversals

There will be times where you want to end your opponent’s offense immediately or prevent them from continuing pressure against you. V-reversal serves this purpose. For one gauge  of your V-trigger bar, you can initiate a V-reversal. The properties of V-reversal differs from character to character. Some characters do an attack, some characters just move away. The input for V-Reversal will be either forward and three punches or forward and three kicks only while you’re blocking. If you are not blocking will you will do a normal attack.

This works best to immediately end an opponents offense and reset the position. A great opportunity to use it is when you are low on health and your opponent has offensive momentum. It should be noted that yes, V-reversals provide an option to escape pressure, but they all have a weakness. For example, most can be thrown.

Thought Exercises

In training mode, set the guard recovery recording and record yourself doing the character’s v-reversal. Find the following information.

Success Lv. 1 = Find 6 V-reversals that are hits.
Success Lv. 2 = Find 4 V-reversals that knock the opponent down.
Success Lv. 3 = Find 4 V-reversals that are not hits.

TIP
Smarter players will jab to bait out your V-reversal, and then follow up by immediately throwing. For this reason, it’s best not to do a V-reversal when an opponent is doing light punch or light kicks of any kind. It’s best to V-reversal during an attack that has a long animation or one that is multiple hits, so that the opponent cannot do anything about it.

Recovery Timings

Each character has moves that will knock you flat on your back. When you get knocked down in Street Fighter, it’s important to realize that you still have defensive options available to you. Many smart players will find ways to immediately continue offense as soon as you recover from a knockdown, however, in SFV when you are knocked down, you have different recovery’s that you can choose from. When getting knocked down, you can either press three punches [or tap down on the control stick] to wake up immediately from where you were knocked down. This is known as “Quick Recovery.” Pressing three kick buttons [or tapping back on the control stick] to wake up will cause your character to move backward and wake up in a different position, but more importantly at a different timing. This is known as “Back Recovery.” Finally, if you don’t press anything your character will wait a long time until they recover. This is called “no recovery”

These options will allow you to  escape pressure situations that you would otherwise have to deal with immediately upon recovering. The best advice to give beginners is that when you’re not feeling very confident about your defense while recovering, do back recovery. Most characters have a harder time dealing with this recovery option. In a nutshell, if you’re getting beat up while you’re trying to get off the ground, try a different wake-up.

Practice Exercises

For yourself choose any character you like. set the training mode dummy to Cammy and try to use either back or quick recovery to escape the pressure situations.

Success Lv. 1 = Record Cammy doing s.HP xx qcf.HK, dash foward, c.mp. Then set the computer to playback and get hit by this set-up. Try to find a way so that you don’t get hit when you’re recovering.

Success Lv. 2 = Record Cammy doing s.HP xx qcf.MK, dash, LP+LK. Get hit by this set-up. Choose between quick or back recovery so that you don’t get thrown.

Success Lv. 3 = Set your character to Ryu. Keep the dummy as Cammy.  Record Cammy doing s.HP xx qcf.HK, dash, s.MK. Set the computer to playback and get hit by this set-up. Do either quick or back recovery and try to jab when you recover to escape the situation. Which recovery worked?

TIP
There are usually 3 ways to recovery from most attacks, however from throws, you do not have the option of back recovery. You can only quick recover or no recover from a throw or command throw. Finally, in situations where you are hit with a counter-hit c.HK from any character, you can only no recover. This situation is quite rare, however, it allows the person on offense a guaranteed timing to continue their pressure. Know your options!

If you’d like to keep a copy of this note for your personal collection, you can download the Evernote version below, which comes equipped with check-boxes on the challenges so you can easily remember where you left off.

Download Link:

Click Here to Download

If you don’t have Evernote, and you’re serious about learning fighting games,  I wholeheartedly recommend you get it to make notes for match-ups, combos, set-ups, etc. It’s an incredibly handy tool to have on your computer, your phone, or tablet. If you’re feeling kind, when you sign up for Evernote, please use the referral link below. It helps me get more storage so I can make more of these guides and distribute them to the public without paying for Evernote’s fees. By referring me, you will also get a free month of Evernote Premium. Talk about a win-win!

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Freshman Series: Basic Offense Guide

The following tutorial is part of our “Freshman Series” tutorials and is made to help people learn the basics of applying offense in fighting games, most specifically, Street Fighter V. The beginning will cover some of the simplest concepts and then then expand into more creative ways of applying offensive pressure to a defending opponent, in order to bypass their guard.

If you have not read our Freshman Series: Execution Tutorial, that is a spiritual prerequisite to this, and it is wholeheartedly recommended you read that first. You can find it on our guides page, which you can find by clicking the bar at the top of this page.

Also at the bottom of this tutorial you’ll find information about how to download it for your personal use.

Frame Traps

Street Fighter can be divided into 2 distinct kinds of phases [People coming from Pokken will really click with this idea]. The first is footsies, where players battle it out fighting for space. There, space control and hitting extended limbs determine the better players. The second phases, we’ll call the “pressure phase.” Here, offensive and defensive capability rule the day. This guide will discuss the first half, detailing all of the basic skills for offense.

The basic premise of this “pressure phase” is that the person on offense gets the chance to press buttons and attack, and the other person, on defense, isn’t allowed to press buttons. Let’s examine what happens when the person on defense tries to break this rule. When on offense, you often leave little gaps between your attacks, so that if someone tries to break the rule of “no pressing buttons on defense,” you hit them. You are letting them hang themselves. The fastest attacks are generally jabs, so leaving small gaps to catch jabs are best. The sequences are known as “frame traps,” because they are traps in your offense; If an opponent presses a button, they get hit.

Thought  Exercises

Choose Chun-Li and set the dummy to Rashid in training mode. Record the dummy Rashid doing the following inputs:

forward dash, forward dash, standing medium punch, standing medium punch. [Combo Notation: f.dash f.dash, s.MP, s.MP]

Make sure the s.MP’s are done as soon as possible one after another. Set the computer to playback, and as Chun-Li, block the first hit and try to do a crouching light punch between the two s.mp attacks.

Success Lv. 1 = Answer the question: What happens? Why? Is this effective?

 

Choose Chun-Li and set the dummy to FANG in training mode. Record the dummy FANG doing the following inputs:

dash forward, dash forward, standing heavy kick, crouching medium punch. [Combo Notation: f.dash, f.dash, s.HK, c.MP]

Make sure the c.mp is done as soon as possible. Set the dummy to playback and as Chun-Li, block the s.HK and try to do a crouching light punch before the c.mp

Success Lv. 1 = Answer the question: What happens? Why? Is this effective?

TIP
SFV has a special “priority system”, where if you and your opponent do attacks which hit each other at the same time, the stronger attack always wins. If a light punch and a medium punch hit at the same time, the person who did the medium punch will win, and the person who did the light punch will be damaged.

In order to have the capability to start your own offense successfully, you must first make sure that your frame traps have enough of a gap to successfully trap your opponent who tries to get a quick attack in through your offense. Having frame traps in which the opponent can hit you and interrupt your offense is detrimental and inhibits you from pressuring and damaging your opponent.

Practice Exercise

Choose the character that you main, and set the dummy to the following characters below in the order they appear. Under the dummy settings, chose block recovery recording and record the character doing a crouching light punch attack [make sure the phrase “reversal” appears when you record the crouching light punch]. Turn on the block recovery playback and set the computer to “guard all” for the block setting.

As the character you main, try to find a frame trap that will hit the opponent when they block your attack and do a c.LP afterward. For the sake of this exercise, try not to make all of your attacks light attacks. One light attack in your frame trap is okay, but avoid making every attack in your frame trap a light attack.

Success Lv. 1 = 5 Successful frame trap attempts against Birdie
Success Lv. 2 = 5 Successful frame trap attempts against Zangief
Success Lv. 3 = 5 Successful frame trap attempts against Necalli
Success Lv. 4 = 5 Successful frame trap attempts against Chun-Li

TIP
Not all characters c.LP hit at the same speed. Generally, bigger and bulkier characters have slower jabs than smaller and more nimble characters. Frametraps that you can’t get to work against Necalli or Chun-Li, might work against Birdie or Zangief, because their light punch attack is slower.

Counter-Hits

Before, you just practiced making your own frame-traps, and you probably noticed, that when the dummy got hit, the “counter-hit” icon appeared on the screen. Counter-hits award you more damage, and also allow you to do combos that aren’t normally possible, while, not all characters can get longer combos from frame trap counter-hits, it’s important to test out your character’s and find out for yourself.

Thought Exercise

Pick Necalli, and set the training dummy to Karin. Go to block recovery recording and record Karin doing a c.LP. Turn on the block recovery playback and set the computer to “none” for the block setting. As Necalli, do the following frame trap:

Standing medium punch, standing medium kick, into crouching medium kick. [Combo Notation: s.MP, s.MK, c.MK]

Success Lv. 1 = Answer the question: What happens? Do any of the hits combo?

Change the guard setting to “guard all” and try to combo the combo again.

Success Lv. 2 = Answer the question: Do any attacks combo? If so, which ones? Is this possible outside of counter-hit?

TIP
Each character has at least one attack that, when it counter-hits, grants you a “Crush Counter.” Crush counters allow you much stronger and damaging combos, and also give your a lot of V-gauge for your V-trigger. Try them out and see what combos you can find!

High & Low Guard

Now that you can use frame traps to stop your opponent from interrupting your offense with jabs and other quick attacks, they will now need to rely on their defense, in layman’s terms, how well they can block. Now you must transition your mindset from frame trapping your opponent to tricking them and getting past their defenses. It was Sun-Tzu who said, “All war is based on deception.” This statement is what determines and separates players who have strong offense versus those whose pressure is sub-par.

Weak players expect the opponent to make a mistake, strong players trick their adversaries.

Going forward you should be trying to deceive your opponents in order to defeat them. Frame trapping forms a basis for your offense by forcing your opponents to block. With their mindset focused on blocking, you should do all that you can to overcome their guard.

Highs and Lows

All guards are not created equal. There are at least two ways through every type of guard. The first, in which we’ll talk about is the concept of an overhead attack. Overhead attacks must be guarded while standing. Overhead attacks will crush and blow through low guard and should be used to hit enemies who incessantly block while crouching. Hitting them with an overhead will make them second-guess their choice to guard.

Practice Exercises

Go and try to find out what attacks or special moves hit overhead. Try different characters. Not all characters have overhead attacks, so familiarize yourself with the ones that do. When you do find them, write down the characters who do have overheads and write what attacks are their overheads. Jumping attacks don’t count for this exercise!

Success Lv. 1 = Find 1 overhead attack
Success Lv. 2 = Find 3 overhead attacks
Success Lv. 3 = Find 5 overhead attacks
Success Lv. 4 = Find 7 overhead attacks

TIP
Because many overheads can be punished if they’re blocked, it’s best to use your overhead at it’s maximum distance. Using it next to the opponent makes it more likely they will retaliate. With a bit of distance, their punish might not reach you.

Jumps and Empty Jumps

Aside from overhead attacks, jumping attacks must also be blocked while standing. This is a commonly known fact, so when a person jumps to attack, the other player will likely stand and block [though anti-airing would be better!]. You can take advantage of this, and do a jump without an attack. Your opponent, assuming a jumping attack is coming, will block high. Instead, don’t do an air attack, but land from the jump and do a crouching light kick instead. This is a low attack, and must be blocked while crouching. If they are stand-blocking, expecting to block your jump attack, they’re in for a rude awakening!

Thought Exercise

In training mode, choose the character you main and set the dummy to Rashid. Record the dummy doing the following inputs:

“Recording Slot 1”: f.dash, f.dash, s.MP, s.MP, f.HP.  [Note: This does not need to combo]
“Recording Slot 2”: f.dash, f.dash, s.MP, s.MP, c.HK.  [Note: This does not need to combo]

Turn on the playback for Slot 1 and slot 2. As your character, try and correctly block all of the attacks.

Success Lv. 1 = Try it a total of 10 times and then stop. Remember, this is offense training. We’re just aiming to show you how effective overhead attacks can be. That being said, how well did you block? I’m going to guess not 100%.

Thought Exercise

Pick M.Bison [Dictator] as the training mode dummy and record him doing the following inputs:

“Recording Slot 1”: f.dash, f.dash, qcb.MP, nj.HP
“Recording Slot 2”: f.dash, f.dash, qcb.MP, nj, c.LK

Turn on the playback for slot 1 and slot 2. Move yourself into the corner, and get hit by M.Bison’s Psycho Inferno attack and normal rise.

Success Lv. 1 = Try to block the high or low attack from the jump afterward correctly 10 times. How many times could you do it? Tricky, eh?

TIP
This strategy is more effective against characters without a “Shoryuken”-like attack. Against the likes of of Ryu or Ken, be careful of using empty jumps! Remember that you’re vulnerable during the entire length of the jump.

The ‘Cross-Up’

The next pressure tool you can add to your offense utility belt is the cross-up. When blocking jumping attacks, like we talked about before, normally we hold the control stick back away from our opponent, however, there is a scenario in which the opponent jump’s over you, and hits you with the back of their knee or foot. This makes it so that holding back or away from your opponent on the joystick causes you to get hit. Be careful as not all jumping attacks are cross-ups. Each character has only one or two, so you should familiarize yourself with them.

Cross-Up Graphic

Practice Exercises

Go into training mode and try to find which characters have cross-up moves and which characters do not. Find each character’s cross-up moves. Set the training dummy to Ryu and standing and guard to none. Jump over the dummy and try to hit the back of his head with a jumping attack. You’ll know if you’re successful because the phrase “Cross-Up” will appear on the side of the screen.

Success Lv. 1 = Find 3 cross-up attacks.
Success Lv. 2 = Find 5 cross-up attacks.
Success Lv. 3 = Find 7 cross-up attacks.
Success Lv. 4 = Find 12 cross-up attacks.

We’re not going to cover blocking strategies here, we’ll save that for the tutorial on defense. Just know, the opponent has to change their guard to block a cross-up successfully. For this reason, it’s an effective tool for offense. There are two main ways to use the cross-up- Either in pressure, or when the opponent is standing up after being knocked down.

In Pressure

While doing frame traps, each successive attack you do, whether blocked or hit, pushes you away from your opponent. You can use this distance to set up the perfect range to do a cross-up on your opponent. This does come with some risk though. you can be hit during the jump before your cross-up attack lands. That being said, it’s not good to abuse this often, but occasionally peppered into your game, it can be scary.

Practice Exercises

Test out some frame traps into cross-ups during pressure. Set the training mode dummy to Ryu, stand, guard all. Try the following set-ups against the dummy. [Note: Because the training dummy is set to guard all, the following attacks are not meant to combo. They are presented in combo notation as just a flow of attacks that you should be doing. They do not actually combo]

Success Lv. 1 = Choose Ken and do the following: c.MP, s.LP, j.MK
Success Lv. 2 = Choose Rashid and do the following: s.MP, s.MP, j.MK
Success Lv. 3 = Choose R.Mika and do the following: c.LP, s.LP, j.MK

TIP
The added benefit of a cross-ups in pressure, is that even if you’re cross-up is blocked, you can still apply frame traps or other means of offense because you’re right next to the opponent! With grappling-focused characters, like Zangief, this is really good for scaring your opponent with a command grab.

On Wake-Up

Cross-Ups, though we just covered using them in pressure, can also be used on knockdowns as well. You need to be careful however that your cross-up will be effective given the opponents wake-up timing. Cross ups are particularly useful on knockdowns because they really limit your opponents defensive options. If they try to use an invincible reversal, there is a highly likely chance, it will go in the wrong direction. The opponent is, for that reason, almost forced to block or face taking damage. it’s in your best interest to find your most common knockdown situations and see if you can find a feasible cross-up scenario.

Practice Exercises

Go into training mode and set the dummy to Ryu, set the guard setting to “After first hit”, and the recovery setting to normal recovery, and try the following set-ups

Success Lv. 1 = As Ryu, try the following: s.MP, s.MP xx qcb.LK, jump forward, j.MK
Success Lv. 2 = As Ken, try the following: c.MP, s.MK xx qcb. LK, jump forward, j.MK
Success Lv. 3 = As Nash, try the following: c.MP, s.MP xx qcf.LP [V-Trigger] c.HK, jump forward, j.MK

TIP
Cross-Ups on wake-up are vulnerable to back and no-recovery. Before you try a cross-up, it’s recommended that you first knock your opponent down and observe how they recover to see if your cross-up on wake-up will be effective or not.

Throws

Before, I mentioned that there are at least 2 ways to beat any kind of guard. The first, was high attacks and low attacks. The second is throws. Throws cannot be guarded against by just blocking. A blocking opponent can always be thrown. When an opponent’s blocking seems to be relentless, and their patience seems overpowering, perhaps its time to try and throw them. Just like guards, throws come in 2 distinct flavors- Normal throws and command throws.

Normal Throws

Normal throws are throws that every character has access to. Each as a forward/neutral throw and a back throw, both with different uses, because of their different properties. The difficulty of normal throws are their abysmal range. You must be very close to the opponent in order to throw them, and will have to stop your frame trap to walk forward and throw an opponent. There is a way around this however. Some attacks have so little push-back, that you can do the attack, and the opponent can still be grabbed afterward, without moving.

Practice Exercises

In training mode, select Cammy as your character, and anyone for the training dummy. Set the dummy to “Guard All.” As Cammy, dash close to the dummy and try the following inputs. In which of these cases did the throw connect after your blocked attack? Check the box(es) where the throw connects.

[ ] s.LP, throw
[ ] c.MK, throw
[ ] s.LK, throw
[ ] c.LK, throw

Thought Exercises

Turn attack data on and try the following:

Success Lv. 1 = Answer the question: Do a forward normal throw. How much damage does it do? How much stun does it do? Right down the numbers.
Success Lv. 2 = Answer the question: Do a back normal throw. How much damage does it do? How much stun does it do? Right down the numbers.
Success Lv. 3 = Answer the question: Based on the information from above, what cases would you use each throw? Do they have different purposes?

TIP
Before we talked about attack priority. Well throws also factor into this system. If a throw and any attack overlap at the same time, the throw will always win. Normal throws have the highest priority of any non-special attacks.

Command Throws

Command throws are the scarier of the 2 types of throws. They are more difficult to guard against (more on that later), can have significantly more range, and often do much more damage than regular throws. luckily, their application is similar. you can use these whenever your opponent isn’t trying to press buttons through your frame-trap, and are just blocking too much. What makes command throws scarier and more powerful is that, unlike regular throws, command grabs cannot be teched. The opponent must backdash or jump to escape. The user of the command throw also needs to be careful here because if the command throw doesn’t hit, or “whiffs” as it’s more commonly called, they can be hit during the ending animation.

Practice Exercises

Go into training mode and try to find which character’s have command throws and which characters do not. Set the training dummy to Ryu and standing and guard to “guard all”. Try all of the character’s special attacks and see which ones grab the training dummy.

Success Lv. 1 = Find 3 characters with command throws
Success Lv. 2 = Find 5 characters with command throws
Success Lv. 3 = Find 7 characters with command throws

TIP
Learn the difference between hit-throws and command throws. Command throws will grab you, even if you’re blocking. There are some moves that look like throws, but aren’t classified as such because, they won’t hurt you if you’re blocking. One example is Birdie’s “Hanging Chain” attack. Make sure you know the difference!

If you’d like to keep a copy of this note for your personal collection, you can download the Evernote version below, which comes equipped with check-boxes on the challenges so you can easily remember where you left off.

Download Link:

Click Here to Download

If you don’t have Evernote, and you’re serious about learning fighting games,  I wholeheartedly recommend you get it to make notes for match-ups, combos, set-ups, etc. It’s an incredibly handy tool to have on your computer, your phone, or tablet. If you’re feeling kind, when you sign up for Evernote, please use the referral link below. It helps me get more storage so I can make more of these guides and distribute them to the public without paying for Evernote’s fees. By referring me, you will also get a free month of Evernote Premium. Talk about a win-win!

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Junior Series: -2 to 2 A guide on the Power of Advantage

 

The following tutorial is part of our “Junior Series” tutorials in order to help people learn and deepen their knowledge of the game after they have a grasp on the basic mechanics of the game.  Using knowledge, this guide will help players to conceptualize difficult and generally unpredictable situations to that they can come to understand the reason behind choices other players might make.

Each section covers a different topic under the umbrella  of frame advantage and disadvantage based on the most prevalent varying factors. At the end of each section, you’ll be given some thought exercises to complete. The purpose of these trails are to help you understand and explain what is happening and more importantly why it is happening.

As a pre-requisite, this guide requires that you know and understand frame data.

 

3 Frame Normals

In Street Fighter, generally, the fastest moves you can do start in 3 frames, yet there exists a nebulous area in which some moves are at a -2 frame advantage or a -1 frame advantage if they are blocked. What are the purposes of frame advantage or disadvantage, when there is no guarantee of damage? What does this range of being -2 or -1 mean for you as a player during a match.

Imagine a situation in which Player A does a move which has a frame advantage of -2. He wants to continue attacking and so does his fastest move, a 3-frame jab. The opponent, Player B also wants to start attacking, so he also does a 3-frame jab. Because of Player A’s disadvantage of -2, he gets hit by his opponents jab on the first frame[The start-up] of his own, resulting in a counter-hit. Player A, even with his fastest move, after the frame disadvantage, he will get hit. What does this mean? It tells us that negative frame advantage of -2 or -1 represents the turning tide of the character’s roles from offense to defense or defense to offense.

It is a shift in momentum.

It establishes norms in the flow of gameplay. A kind of prescribed rule. Doing a move with -2 frame advantage says to your opponent, “My offense is over, now it’s your turn.” Imagine a game of poker. Good players know to play a hand with good potential and to fold a hand with bad or no potential.  Think of the frame advantage as your potential. In the last scenario, Player A was at -2 frame advantage- This is bad potential, and so he shouldn’t have continued attacking. He shouldn’t have risked his health by pressing jab when he was at a -2 frame advantage. Player B on the other hand, was not in such a situation, but knew that his opponent had bad potential, and could use it to attack. Good players constantly internalize and think about this when they play.

3vs3chart

So now that you know the honest way to play the scenario, what happens when you don’t want to shift the momentum? Is there a way that you can keep attacking even when you’re at a frame disadvantage? What do you do if you don’t want to give up your turn? The answer, as you might have guessed, is an invincible reversal. A move that blows through all others.

So let’s look at the situation again. Player A is at -2 disadvantage and he doesn’t want to shift the momentum; he wants to keep attacking. So instead of jabbing, he does an invincible reversal. Player B on the other hand though that because his opponent was at -2 frame advantage, he , himself could start attack, so he did a jab, and was hit by his opponent’s invincible reversal. He will remember this. The invincible reversal allows you a way to keep momentum and keep attacking. It affords you a way to break, the general rule of thumb- -2 means that you give up the offensive position. This breach of the mutual contract between players does not come with some penalty however. Let’s look.

Player A and B, eternally locked in battle, meet again. Player A, again does an attack and is at -2 advantage, but again, wants to keep attacking. Player B also wants to attack, but he remembers the invincible reversal Player A did last time, and this time Player B blocks. The invincible reversal hits nothing and with it’s huge frame disadvantage compounded with its counter-hit state during the recovery, Player A has to pay in spades. Player B will punish him, and likely end with a knockdown that will afford Player B another advantage situation. Player A played a hand with bad potential, but lied and bet big to make Player B think he had a good hand. Player B smelled the lie and called Player A out on it.

This situation can have many different outcomes. Think to yourself about each of the player’s following options. Selecting any pair is a likely outcome in this kind of -2 position. Think about why and in what situation each player is likely to choose a certain option.

AvsBoptions

Thought Exercises

Set a computer player Karin to do a reversal c.LP as a guard recovery action. Set the Karin’s guard to “Guard All.”  At point-blank range, do Rashid’s s.HK and immediately do a s.LK afterward.

What happens? Check the frame data for the game here. Can you explain to yourself why it happens?

Set a computer player Laura to do a reversal s.LP as a guard recovery action. Set the Laura’s guard to “Guard All.” At point-blank range, do Ryu’s c.MP and immediately do a s.LP afterward.

What happens? Check the frame data for the game. Can you explain to yourself why it happens?

The Case of 3 vs. 4

Up until this point, Player A and B have been operating under the premise that both have a 3-frame jab as their fastest attack, however, in Street Fighter V not every character’s fastest move starts in 3 frames- some start in 4. This small difference might seem unimportant, but it hsa large implications. Let’s assume Player A does a move that leaves him at -1 frame advantage. This time, no funny business, both player A and player B do their fastest attack. A has a 3-frame jab and B has a 4-frame jab. In this case they will trade.

The reason here is obvious. Player A has to wait 1 additional frame plus his 3 frame jab means that the jab will come out on frame 4, the same frame as Player B’s 4 frame jab.

Untitled-1

This means that even advantage [0 frame advantage] is actually advantage for player A, who has a 3 frame jab. The take away here is that in this spectrum, player B has less chances to take momentum, and will likely play a more defensive role in the match. When player B has a +1 advantage, it actually means he will trade with player A’s 3-frame jab. if you are a character with this 4-frame attack, you are not at advantage unless you are at +2 or your opponent is at -2 frame advantage. 2 is your magical number, and so you should always be vigilant in matches to arrive at that number.

4vs3chart

Thought Exercises

Set a computer player Ken to do a reversal s.LK as a guard recovery action. Set the Ken’s guard to “Guard All.”  At point-blank range, do Chun-Li’s f.HK and immediately do a c.LP afterward.

What happens? Check the frame data for the game here. Can you explain to yourself why it happens?

Set a computer player Chun-Li to do a reversal c.LP as a guard recovery action. Set the Chun-Li’s guard to “Guard All.” At point-blank range, do Ken’s c.MP and immediately do s.LK afterward.

What happens? Check the frame data for the game. Can you explain to yourself why it happens?

BONUS

Set a computer player Chun-Li to do a reversal c.LP as a guard recovery action. Set the Chun-Li’s guard to “Guard All.” At point-blank range, do Ken’s c.MP and immediately do b.MP afterward.

What happens? Check the frame data for the game. Can you explain to yourself why it happens? If not, ask on-line or to friends and see if you can figure out why this happens.

TIP
Think about the strength of the button.

Speed vs. Length

Again, all the examples below have played on the assumption that after an attack, both player A and player B are next to each other, where in matches, it is possible that the enemy will be far away from you when they are at -2 frame advantage. The will likely do a block string, and then not do a move that is -2 until they are far away. If you were to jab to get the momentum of the match, you wouldn’t hit anything.

In the earlier pats of this guide, we studied the nature of only the frame data. Here we will look at the implications of distance and what it means, when speed is also taken into account. This concept is probably one of the most widely misunderstood areas when talking about analyzing frame data. Before we start, we need to establish 2 more pieces of information. The first is the recovery time of 3- and 4-frame attacks. While these moves are fast to begin, they have an average of 7 frames of recovery.

The basic 3-frame normal frame data reads like this:

Start-Up: 3 Frames
Active: 2 Frames
Recovery: 7 Frames
Total: 11 Frames

*Note: It is 11 and not 12 frames total, because the last start-up frame and the first active frame are the same frame.

The second piece of information is that every character has some kind of move that stretches a limb very far and is generally used to poke rom a distance. The start-up of these moves typically range from 6 to 8 frames. For our examples today, we’ll use an overage of 7 frames to make our calculations. As a side note, these moves leave the user at -2 or-3 on block.

With the prerequisite information out of the way, let’s look at some more examples scenarios. For these situations, assume that the jab done will not hit the opponent.

Player A and player B take the field again. Player A does a blockstring that ultimately leaves him at a distance outside of player B’s 3-frame jab. Player B thinks of this situation, like all the others, and decides to jab to gain momentum. Because of the distance, his jab whiffs. Player A is wise to this situation, and so appropriately responds by doing a “poke” moves at the same time as Player B’s jab. So what happens? Who is the victor in this bout?

Player A. Let’s look at why.

FrameVsDistance

Player B’s whiffed jab gets hit during the recovery of his move. In this case, where distance plays a factor, assuming both players press a button at the soonest possible point, the slower attack will win. If you can set up a situation like this, the player who tries to jab, will always lose to the poke. The poke will always lose to a slower attack. This seems very strong for Player A. So what is the solution to this situation for player B? Likely to wait. Waiting, allows Player B the chance to whiff punish “A’s” stronger and slower attacks, however mindgames quickly evolve and spiral into an endless tree of possibilities, because the players have returned to a neutral position, and move back into the footsies stage of the match. Frame data plays a smaller role here and distance rules out.

Thought Exercises

Set a computer player Necalli to do a reversal c.LP as a guard recovery action. Set the Necalli’s guard to “Guard All.”  At 1/2 a large square’s range [On the training mode floor], do Cammy’s s.MK and immediately do a c.MK afterward.

What happens? Check the frame data for the game here. Can you explain to yourself why it happens?

Set a computer player Necalli to do a reversal s.HP as a guard recovery action. Set the Necalli’s guard to “Guard All.” At 1/2 a large square’s range [On the training mode floor] do Cammy’s s.MK and immediately do c.MK afterward.

What happens? Check the frame data for the game. Can you explain to yourself why it happens?

 

The examples used here are merely the averages of all the data from characters in the game SFV, and it’s recommended that you go into training mode and find ways to exploit the magical range of -2 to 2. By doing so, you’ll not only see yourself taking advantage in more situations when you play, but as a result, start winning more.

If you’d like to keep a copy of this note for your personal collection, you can download the Evernote version below, which comes equipped with check-boxes on the challenges so you can easily remember where you left off.

Download Link:

Click Here to Download

If you don’t have Evernote, and you’re serious about learning fighting games,  I wholeheartedly recommend you get it to make notes for match-ups, combos, set-ups, etc. It’s an incredibly handy tool to have on your computer, your phone, or tablet. If you’re feeling kind, when you sign up for Evernote, please use the referral link below. It helps me get more storage so I can make more of these guides and distribute them to the public without paying for Evernote’s fees. By referring me, you will also get a free month of Evernote Premium. Talk about a win-win!

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Freshman Series: Execution Tutorial

The following tutorial is part of our “Freshman Series” tutorials in order to help people learn to do and practice the difficult, and often confusing motions that many fighting games require of it’s players. The beginning is simple and will ease the player into the games mechanics as not to be overwhelmed. This tutorial is not meant to be done in a single sitting, but perhaps over the course of a week or two.

For each section you’ll first get an understanding and some knowledge of how the moves or concepts are performed. After which, you’ll be given some challenges to do with a variety of characters to practice the concepts that you learned. Each challenge has a level of difficulty attached do it. The challenges should be done in ascending order, starting with the lowest level difficulty and working your way up from there.

Before any of the challenges are some important vocabulary and terms that you should familiarize yourself with. These terms will be used throughout the guide, and require you know them. At any time, you can refer back to them if need be. Also at the bottom of this tutorial you’ll find information about how to download it for your personal use.

Important Vocabulary

LP = light punch; also called jab.
MP = medium punch; also called strong.
HP = heavy punch; also called fierce.

LK = light kick; also called short.
MK = medium kick; also called forward.
HK = heavy kick; also called roundhouse.

s. = standing
c. = crouching
j. = jumping

qcf. = quarter circle forward motion
qcb. = quarter circle backward motion
dp. = dragon punch motion [forward, down, down-forward on the joystick]
bf. = back-forward charge motion
du. = down-up charge motion

normal = any attack initiated by pressing only a button.
special attack = any attack that is initiated by a joystick motion and pressing a button.
target combo = special combos wherein the moves of the combo can be canceled into one another.

left side = to the left of your opponent
right side = to the right side of your opponent.

Links

  • Do an attack. Wait till it ends. Do another attack. This is a “link.” You are “linking” two attacks together in one combo.
  • Links require timing to perform, but are the basis for all combos
  • While the opponent is still reeling back you can hit them again.

Input Tut Link Graphic

Practice Exercises

Do Ryu’s s.MP, s.MP. Make sure the combo counter says “2 Hits.”

Success Lv. 1 = 5 successful links in a row.
Success Lv. 2 = 10 successful links in a row.

Do Ryu’s s.HK, s.LK. Make sure the combo counter says “2 Hits.

Success Lv. 1 = 5 successful links in a row.
Success Lv. 2 = 10 successful links in a row.

Do Ryu’s s.MP, c.HP. Make sure the combo counter says “2 Hits.

Success Lv. 1 = 5 successful links in a row.
Success Lv. 2 = 10 successful links in a row.

TIP
The game mechanics will help you, and the normal will still come out if you press the button a bit early. Its better to do the link a little bit faster, rather than a little bit slower.

Special Moves

Basic Stick Movement

  • Move the joystick in a circular motion. Try to complete one rotation in one second. Keep time by counting “1 Mississippi.”
  • Divide the area the stick can move like a keyboard number pad. Up=8, Right=6, Down=2, Left=4

Quarter-Circle Forward / Backward

  • Move the joystick to the 2 position / the down position.
  • Using the same speed when you made the circular motions before, move the joystick to the 6 position / the left position.
  • Immediately after the joystick reaches the 6 position, press a button. This is the quarter circle forward motion.
  • If your character jumps, you moved the joystick to the upright position / 9 position. This is too far. Try again and end the movement at the 6 position.
  • To do a quarter-circle backward motion, again start at the 6 position, and move the stick toward the 4 position and immediately press a button. If your character jumps backward, you went too far and ended at the 7 position.
  • Take care to end the motion at the 4 position and try again.

Practice Exercises

Do Chun-Li’s Hyakuretsu special move by doing a quarter circle forward motion and pressing kick.

Success Lv. 1 = 5 successful Hyakuretsu in a row on the left side.
Success Lv. 2 = 5 successful Hyakuretsu strikes in a row on the right side.
Success Lv. 3 = 10 successful Hyakuretsu strikes in a row on the left side.
Success Lv. 4 = 10 successful Hyakuretsu strikes in a row on the right side.

Do Cammy’s Cannon Strike special move by doing a quarter circle backward motion and pressing kick while in the air.

Success Lv. 1 = 5 successful Cannon Strikes in a row on the left side.
Success Lv. 2 = 5 successful Cannon Strikes in a row on the right side.
Success Lv. 3 = 10 successful Cannon Strikes in a row on the left side.
Success Lv. 4 = 10 successful Cannon Strikes in a row on the right side.

TIP
In training mode, you can turn on your inputs to see if you’re making mistakes. Open the training mode options and turn key display to “on.” If your motions are correct and the move still isn’t coming out. You might be trying to do it too fast. Slow down a little bit.

Charge Motion Back-Forward

  • Hold backward / 4 position [away from the direction your character is facing] on the joystick. Hold this for about 2 seconds time.
  • When holding backward at the 4 position, please note that holding down-back [The 1 position] is also considered charging backward for the charge back-forward motion.
  • After 2 seconds, move the joystick to the forward / 6 position and immediately press the punch button. This is a back-forward charge motion.
  • When you perform the motion, if you do a normal attack without doing the special attack, you either didn’t hold the charge motion long enough [Trying counting with “Mississippi”] or you pressed the button too quickly [wait for a split second more].

Practice Exercises

Do F.A.N.G.’s Ryobenda special move by doing the charge back-forward motion and pressing kick.

Success Lv. 1 = 5 successful Ryobenda in a row on the left side.
Success Lv. 2 = 5 successful Ryobenda in a row on the right side.
Success Lv. 3 = 10 successful Ryobenda in a row on the left side.
Success Lv. 4 = 10 successful Ryobenda ina row on the right side.

Charge Motion Down-Up

  • Hold down / 2 position on the joystick. Hold this for about 2 seconds time.
  • When holding down at the 2 position, please note that holding down-back [The 1 position] is also considered charging backward for the charge down-up motion.
  • After 2 seconds, move the joystick to the up position / 8 position and immediately press the punch button. This is the down-up charge motion.
  • When you perform the motion, if you do a normal jumping attack and not the special attack, you either didn’t hold the charge long enough [Again, try counting “Mississippi”] or you pressed the button to late.
  • The timing may take some time to master, so it is best if you start by pressing the button too early, and slowly increase how quickly you press the button after doing the joystick motion.

Practice Exercises

Do M.Bison [Dictator]’s Head Press special move by doing the charge down-up motion and pressing kick.

Success Lv. 1 = 1 successful Head Press.
Success Lv. 2 = 3 successful Head Press in a row.
Success Lv. 3 = 5 successful Head Press in a row.
Success Lv. 4 = 10 successful Head Press in a row.

TIP
Because the charge back motion and the charge down motion both accept the down-back [The 1 position], it is best to use this position to charge. Because charge characters tend to have both down-up and back-forward charges, by using the down-back position, you have the chance to react with either type of move during a match depending on the situation you might find yourself in.

Dragon Punch Motion

  • First, hold the joystick forward at the 6 position.
  • Move the joystick 2 position, and then slide it to the 3 position.
  • Remember the speed you used moving the joystick in a circle? Don’t forget to use this level of speed to do the input.
  • Be careful not to go from the 2 position to the 6 position, during the last motion your you might get a critical art attack input.

Practice Exercises

Do Ken’s Shoryuken special move by doing the dragon punch motion and pressing punch.

Success Lv. 1 = 3 successful Shoryuken in a row on the left side.
Success Lv. 2 = 3 successful Shoryuken in a row on the right side.
Success Lv. 3 = 7 successful Shoryuken in a row on the left side.
Success Lv. 4 = 7 successful Shoryuken in a row on the right side.
Success Lv. 5 = 10 successful Shoryuken in a row on the left side.
Success Lv. 6 = 10 successful Shoryuken in a row on the right side.

TIP
The game system allows a special shortcut for the dragon punch input, other than the one mentioned above. You will also do a dragon punch motion if you tap the joystick at the 3 position quickly 2 times in succession. This is perhaps the most useful input shortcut in the game, however be advised there are other shortcuts like this.

Cancels

Target Combos

  • Some normal attacks can be canceled into other normal attacks or specials.
  • To cancel into other normals, simply press the net attack when the first normal hits.
  • Not all normals can be canceled into other normals. The game only allows very specific combinations that vary from character to character. For more information about this, check the command list for the character you use. They will be listed under “Unique Attacks.”

Input Tut Cancel Graphic

Practice Exercises

Do Nash’s Wind Shear 2nd Target combo by pressing standing MP > standing LK > standing HP. All 3 hits should register as a combo.

Success Lv. 1 = 5 successful Wind Shear 2nd in a row.
Success Lv. 2 = 10 successful Wind Shear 2nd in a row.

Do Necalli’s Sacrificial Altar and Follow-up by pressing standing MK > standing HK > and finally, MP and MK at the same time. All 3 hits should register as a combo.

Success Lv. 1 = 5 successful Sacrificial Altar and Follow-Up in a row.
Success Lv. 2 = 10 successful Sacrificial Altar and Follow-Up in a row.

TIP
The timing for many character’s target combos can vary, but as a general rule, press the next button when you see the first attack hit. There are lots of different target combos in the game, and you should familiarize yourself with them to practice your execution.

Special Cancels

  • Every character has at least 1 normal attack that can be canceled into a special move.
  • First perform the normal attack.
  • Just before or as it hits, do the motion for the special attack. Do the motion quickly, but do not sacrifice doing a correct input for too much speed.
  • If need be, turn on key display in the training mode options to check if your inputs are correct.

 Practice Exercises

Do Birdie’s standing MP canceled into a bull head attack [quarter circle forward motion and press the light punch button]. Both hits should register as a 2 hit combo.

Success Lv. 1 = 1 successful cancel.
Success Lv. 2 = 3 successful cancels in a row on the left side.
Success Lv. 3 = 3 successful cancels in a row on the right side.
Success Lv. 4 = 5 successful cancels in a row on the left side.
Success Lv. 5 = 5 successful cancels in a row on the right side.

Do Karin’s crouching MP canceled into Mujinkyaku [quarter circle back motion and press the heavy kick button]. It should register as a 5 hit combo.

Success Lv. 1 = 1 successful cancel.
Success Lv. 2 = 3 successful cancels in a row on the left side.
Success Lv. 3 = 3 successful cancels in a row on the right side.
Success Lv. 4 = 5 successful cancels in a row on the left side.
Success Lv. 5 = 5 successful cancel sin a row on the right side.

Do Bison’s crouching MP canceled into Psycho Blast [charge back-forward motion and press the light punch button]. It should register as a 2 hit combo.

Success Lv. 1 = 1 successful cancel.
Success Lv. 2 = 3 successful cancels in a row on the left side.
Success Lv. 3 = 3 successful cancels in a row on the right side.
Success Lv. 4 = 5 successful cancels in a row on the left side.
Success Lv. 5 = 5 successful cancel sin a row on the right side.

TIP
Not all moves can be canceled into specials attacks, however each character does have a range of normal attacks that can be canceled to deal more damage. Explore the characters you’re interested in and see what moves they have that are special-cancelable.

Combos

  •  Doing combos, combines all of the knowledge that you have practiced thus far and, puts them into practice at the same time.
  • Combos can contain, links, target combos, special moves, and cancels.
  • Try the Practice Exercises below to see how much you can apply. If you need help, refer back to the appropriate sections above.
  • Remember, these likely won’t work on the first try. Before you go and ask for combo help on the Internet, put some serious time into trying to doing the combo, changing the timing of the areas in which you have problems a little bit each time. You’ll likely find the correct timing this way.

Practice Exercises

Do Ryu’s standing medium punch, linked into another standing medium, canceled into standing heavy punch, canceled into standing heavy kick. Combo Notation: s.MP, s.MP > s.HP > s.HK. It should register as a 4 hit combo.

Success Lv. 1 = 3 successful combos
Success Lv. 2 = 5 successful combos
Success Lv. 3 = 10 successful combos

 Do Ken’s standing medium kick canceled into a standing heavy kick, canceled into a heavy punch Shoryuken [dragon punch motion and press the heavy punch button]. Combo Notation: s.MK > s.HK xx dp.HP. It should register as a 5 hit combo.

Success Lv. 1 = 3 successful combos in a row on the left side.
Success Lv. 2 = 3 successful combos in a row on the right side.
Success Lv. 3 = 5 successful combos in a row on the left side.
Success Lv. 4 = 5 successful combos in a row on the right side.

 Do Cammy’s standing medium punch, linked into standing heavy punch, canceled into a Spiral Arrow [quarter circle forward motion and press the heavy kick punch button]. Combo Notation: s.MP, s.HP xx qcf.HK. It should register as a 4 hit combo.

Success Lv. 1 = 3 successful combos in a row on the left side.
Success Lv. 2 = 3 successful combos in a row on the right side.
Success Lv. 3 = 5 successful combos in a row on the left side.
Success Lv. 4 = 5 successful combos in a row on the right side.

Do the following Necalli combo.

Success Lv. 1 = standing heavy punch canceled into valiant rebellion [quarter circle forward motion and press the medium kick button]. Combo Notation: s.HP xx qcf.MK. It should register as a 2 hit combo.

Success Lv. 2 = standing heavy punch canceled into valiant rebellion, linked into crouching medium punch. Combo Notation: s.HP xx qcf.MK, c.MP. It should register as a 3 hit combo.

Success Lv. 3 = standing heavy punch canceled into valiant rebellion, linked into crouching medium punch, canceled into the disc’s guidance [charge back-forward motion and press the light punch button]. Combo Notation: s.HP xx qcf.MK, c.MP xx bf.LP. It should register as a 4 hit combo.

Success Lv. 4 = perform the combo from success Lv. 3, 3 times in a row on the left side.

Success Lv. 5 = perform the combo from success Lv. 3, 3 times in a row on the right side.

TIP
For Necalli’s combo, after you do the Valiant Rebellion, hold the joystick at down back [1 position] so that you have enough time to charge for The Disc’s Guidance at the end of the combo. You can use this kind of technique in combos for charge characters to get enough time during the combo to do a charge special move.

If you’d like to keep a copy of this note for your personal collection, you can download the Evernote version below, which comes equipped with check-boxes on the challenges so you can easily remember where you left off.

Download Link:

Click Here to Download

If you don’t have Evernote, and you’re serious about learning fighting games,  I wholeheartedly recommend you get it to make notes for match-ups, combos, set-ups, etc. It’s an incredibly handy tool to have on your computer, your phone, or tablet. If you’re feeling kind, when you sign up for Evernote, please use the referral link below. It helps me get more storage so I can make more of these guides and distribute them to the public without paying for Evernote’s fees. By referring me, you will also get a free month of Evernote Premium. Talk about a win-win!

Referral Link:

Click Here to Sign Up for Evernote!

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